We love the Zandra Rhodes Digital Study Collection project blog. Firstly, the Zandra Rhodes collection is fantastic and the blog really helps to show this off, but the blog also provides a unique and useful insight into the processes of archive cataloguing and providing online access, as well as the trivialities and potential problems that might occur when dealing with textiles and textile designs specifically.

Zandra Rhodes Digital Study Collection project

The photography of 500 garments has now been completed, and the project team is currently working on putting the Zandra Rhodes Digital Study Collection online!

1. Developing a trial version
The images and metadata have been uploaded to the private test website for VADS.  This initial version of the Zandra Rhodes Digital Study Collection has been tested in-house and several adjustments were made to the interface at this stage.  For example, we’ve doubled the default size of the thumbnail images on the search results pages, and a ‘zoom’ feature was also introduced for the Zandra Rhodes images.

2. Student interns provide their feedback
A student focus group was held at UCA’s Rochester campus in November, with student interns from BA Fashion Design and BA Fashion Textiles who have already assisted us with the photography and documentation stage of the project at Zandra Rhodes Studio in London.  The students were…

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medievalfragments

Today’s blog is a guest post from Thijs Porck, a lecturer in the Department of English Language and Culture, Universiteit Leiden.

This week Erik’s tweet on cat-paws in a fifteenth-century manuscript went viral across facebook and the twittersphere when it was shared and commented on by thousands. Follow @erik_kwakkel  today for more animal-themed tweets #manuscriptzoo

Everyone who has ever owned a cat will be familiar with their unmannerly feline habit of walking across your keyboard while you are typing. One of the manuscript pictures tweeted by @erik_kwakkel (http://twitter.com/erik_kwakkel/status/303614922103865346/photo/1 ) revealed that this is nothing new.

Although the medieval owner of this manuscript may have been quite annoyed with these paw marks on his otherwise neat manuscript, another fifteenth-century manuscript reveals that he got off lucky.  A Deventer scribe, writing around 1420, found his manuscript ruined by a urine stain left there by a cat the night before…

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Multimedia Information and Technology Journal article

The Archives and Collections Centre and our blog have been featured in the forthcoming edition of the Multimedia Information and Technology Journal!

GSA's Archives and Collections Centre

GSA’s Archives and Collections Centre

The main publication of the Multimedia Information and Technology Group is its quarterly journal Multimedia Information & Technology, which provides comprehensive coverage of major developments in multimedia applications for information services and related sectors. Each issue covers news items, technology developments, product reviews and book and media reviews.

The current issue of the Multimedia Information and Technology Journal

The current issue of the Multimedia Information and Technology Journal

The Multimedia Information and Technology Group is a Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) group.The Multimedia Information and Technology Group aims to unite CILIP members engaged in, or interested in, multimedia information and technology developments in library and information science.

You can keep up to date with news and events on the group’s website. And you can read this month’s edition, including the article about the Archives and Collections Centre and our blog, here: MmITFeb13web-news

Archives and Collections Centre Projects: New website feature!

GSA The Magazine, digitization project, 2010-2011

GSA The Magazine, digitization project, 2010-2011

We’ve revamped our website! You can now find out lots of information about the sorts of projects the Archives and Collections Centre has been involved in over the past few years.

From conserving the Mackintosh Building, digitizing our collections and being involved in various exhibitions and events to working on research and documentation projects such as the Glasgow Miracle and the Gillespie, Kidd and Coia architecture project, please do have a look at the website to find out more about what we’ve been up to.

If you are interested in working with the Archives and Collections Centre as part of a collaborative and/or creative project, please get in touch, we’d love to hear from you.

Gillespie, Kidd and Coia, research and cataloguing project, 2006-2009

Gillespie, Kidd and Coia, research and cataloguing project, 2006-2009

Poster Art 150 – London Underground’s Greatest Designs

Brightest London, London Underground Poster, 1924

Brightest London, London Underground Poster, 1924

An exhibition entitled Poster Art 150 – London Underground’s Greatest Designs at London Transport Museum is currently showing off 150 advertising posters to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the London Underground. Each decade since the first commission in 1908 is represented and those on display have been specially selected from the Museum’s archive of over 3,300 Underground posters by an expert panel. Iconic posters, including the surrealist photographer Man Ray’s ‘Keeps London Going’ pair, as well a those by Edward McKnight Kauffer and Paul Nash, will feature alongside lesser-known gems.

We have our very own collection of transport posters, by Glasgow School of Art student John Hegarty.

NMC 570, Poster depicting Castle Campbell, Dollar. For the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hegarty, c1927

NMC 570, Poster depicting Castle Campbell, Dollar. For the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hegarty, c1927

NMC 572, Poster depicting the Wallace Monument, for the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hegarty, c1927

NMC 572, Poster depicting the Wallace Monument, for the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hegarty, c1927

NMC 571, Poster depicting Linlithgow Palace, for the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hergarty, 1927

NMC 571, Poster depicting Linlithgow Palace, for the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hergarty, 1927

And, though not represented in our own collection, some other GSA graduates also went on to design for transport companies, including Tom Gentleman and Tom Gilfillan.

Easter in the country, by Tom Gentleman, 1932

Easter in the country, by Tom Gentleman, 1932. Gentleman was a student at GSA from 1905 (aged just 13) until 1914.

Scotland: Its Highlands and Islands (off Staffa) by Tom Gilfillan, printed by John Horne for LMS

Scotland: Its Highlands and Islands (off Staffa) by Tom Gilfillan, printed by John Horne for LMS

Gilfillan was a student at the Art School on and off from 1915-1931 and went on to be a designer for Scottish Aviation. The Maclaurin Gallery is planning a forthcoming exhibition of Tom’s work – Imagined Skies: The Lost Murals of Tom Gilfillan runs from 18th August – 29th September later this year.

The London Underground exhibition runs until 1st October 2013. For more information about the exhibition please visit the event website.

testing, testing… tick tock, tick tock

Mackintosh Studio Clocks restoration project (2011-13)

In June 2011, the Archives and Collections Centre was awarded a grant by Museums Galleries Scotland under its Recognition scheme. The amount awarded was £16,800.

The Mackintosh Studio Clocks restoration project intends to conserve and reinstate the original studio clocks, designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh in 1910. The importance of these wooden clocks is that they were run as an electrically operated ‘master and slave’ system – a rare and important technical innovation of the time.

Since the early 1990s the clocks have no longer worked (caused mainly by the failure of various technical components). The project seeks to reinstate the clocks back to their original working condition and to provide evidence as to their significance to early 20th century British horology.

After many months of hard work, today sees the first of the clocks being tested in our Archives and Collections Centre… and by jove it works! A momentous day indeed.

Horologist Nick Sanders and GSA Curator Peter Trowles work on one of the original Mackintosh clocks in the Archives and Collections Centre

Horologist Nick Sanders and GSA Curator Peter Trowles work on one of the original Mackintosh clocks in the Archives and Collections Centre

Happy Valentine’s!

Whether you’re a lover or a fighter, we hope you enjoy some romantic images from GSA’s archives and collections…

Photograph of GSA students Alec Milne and Alice Smith dancing in costume, 1910s.

Photograph of GSA students Alec Milne and Alice Smith dancing in costume, 1910s.

Handkerchief sachet showing a cupid dancing through flowers and leaves, by Rebecca Crompton. Machine embroidered in grey, pink and black on white silk background, 1938.

Handkerchief sachet showing Cupid dancing through flowers and leaves, by Rebecca Crompton. Machine embroidered in grey, pink and black on white silk background, 1938.

New Glasgow Miracle blog post

Volunteer archive researcher Cedric Tai shares more of his thoughts about his work on the Glasgow Miracle project… Visit the Glasgow Miracle blog to read about the ways in which the Third Eye Centre archive illustrates how the centre saw itself as a source of education and a place to consider social and contemporary issues but all the while had to balance this with accessibility.

This is an image of a publication between Acme, SPACE and the Arts Council of Great Britain, The image is courtesy of the Third Eye Centre/CCA

This is an image of a publication between Acme, SPACE and the Arts Council of Great Britain, The image is courtesy of the Third Eye Centre/CCA