Works from GSA’s collection on display at The Dick Institute

Two works from our collection, The Two Roberts by Ian Fleming and Interested and Disinterested by John Laurie, will be on display as part of a new exhibition on Robert Colquhoun at The Dick Institute in Kilmarnock.

GSAA/NMC 020, The Painters Colquhoun & McBryde  (The Two Roberts), by Ian Fleming, 1937-38

GSAA/NMC 020, The Painters Colquhoun & McBryde (The Two Roberts), by Ian Fleming, 1937-38

Comprising works from the East Ayrshire collection and loans from collectors and institutions across the UK, including GSA’s Archives and Collections, this exhibition marking the 100th anniversary of the birth of Robert Colquhoun, will feature drawings, paintings and prints by Colquhoun and Robert MacBryde, his long time collaborator, alongside a display of work by some of the Neo-Romantic painters and other contemporaries who influenced their work.

GSAA/NMC 027, Interested & Disinterested, by John Laurie, c1939

GSAA/NMC 027, Interested & Disinterested, by John Laurie, c1939

Colquhoun was born in Kilmarnock in 1914 and educated at Loanhead Primary School and Kilmarnock Academy, where he showed early promise as an artist. Despite the economic pressures of the time, Colquhoun’s family received financial support from local benefactors which allowed him to remain at school and go on to study at Glasgow School of Art in 1933. There he met fellow artist and Ayrshire native Robert MacBryde, with whom he would form a lifelong partnership, the ‘Two Roberts’ living and working together for almost 30 years. After graduating, and a short period travelling and producing art in mainland Europe, the pair returned to Britain in the run-up to WW2 and settled in London, immersing themselves in the bohemian community of painters and writers, and were on familiar terms with Lucian Freud, Francis Bacon, Dylan Thomas and others. They were soon influenced by the group of artists known as the Neo-Romantics – painters of visionary and imaginative landscapes of sombre tone.

The Burns Monument Centre will host a display about Robert Colquhoun and the Kilmarnock Academy archives complementing the Colquhoun & MacBryde exhibition and showcasing the significant archives of Kilmarnock Academy, from the school’s earliest years through the 20th century, including records and photographs of some of its famous ex-pupils (See here for more information).

The exhibition preview  is this evening at the Dick Institute, Elmbank Avenue, Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, KA1 3BU but will be open to the public  from 25th January – 19th April 2014 (free, 11am-5pm, closed Sundays). Call 01563 554300 or visit the Dick Institute website for more information.

Advertisements

New display in GSA Library: Talwin Morris, Bookbinder

Treasures of GSA Library

Image

You may have noticed a couple of new displays in GSA Library over the last few weeks. While one of these displays, the one on Level 1, is devoted to Anatomy, we have dedicated the other on Level 2 to Talwin Morris, Bookbinder.

Talwin Morris (1865-1911) is an important figure in the history and development of Glasgow Style design at the turn of the 20th century. He knew many people who attended the Glasgow School of Art, including Charles Rennie Mackintosh who he recommended as an architect to publisher Walter Blackie. The result of that commission is the celebrated Hill House in Helensburgh.

The Library holds a number of Glasgow Style bookbindings by Morris in its special collections, designed by him during his tenure as Art Director at Blackie & Son publishers. Between 1892 and 1909 Morris was a prolific designer of bindings for the company and its subsidiary, Gresham Publishing. He…

View original post 244 more words

New display in GSA Library: Anatomy at The Glasgow School of Art

You may have noticed a couple of new displays in GSA Library over the last few weeks. While one of these displays, the one on Level 2, is devoted to Talwin Morris and bookbinding, GSA Archives and Collections and Library staff have dedicated the other to anatomy.

Anatomy drawing has historically formed an important part of art education. Up until 1900, Glasgow School of Art followed the National Course of Instruction, or the South Kensington system. Of the 23 stages that the system prescribed, Stage 9, “Anatomical studies”, included drawing from the human figure, animal forms and from nature.

GSAA/P/1/783 – Photographs of students in the Anatomy Room, c1910

GSAA/P/1/783 – Photographs of GSA students in the Anatomy Room, c1910

Glasgow School of Art’s Archives and Collections holds a selection of material related to the history of anatomy drawing at the School, including prospectuses which outline the place of anatomy drawing in the School’s curriculum; photographs of students drawing in the School’s Anatomy Room; anatomy drawings by former students of the School; lantern slides of anatomical subjects; and some correspondence related to the teaching of anatomy drawing, such as a letter from the Director to Professor Bryce, Regius Professor of Anatomy at Glasgow University, requesting permission for GSA anatomy students to work at the
University.

Cricket, Over Arm Bowling n°69, plate 290 – assorted plate from Animal locomotion: an  electro-photographic investigation of consecutive phases of animal movements by  Eadweard Muybridge, c1887

Cricket, Over Arm Bowling n°69, plate 290 – assorted plate from Animal locomotion: an
electro-photographic investigation of consecutive phases of animal movements by
Eadweard Muybridge, c1887

GSA Library holds a number of rare anatomical treatises in its Special Collections, which have served as inspiration to renowned artists such as Christine Borland and more recently Kate Davis for her exhibition ‘Not Just the Perfect Moments’ in 2012. The Library is also lucky to hold a number of original 1887 plates from Eadweard Muybridge’s seminal photographic study Animal Locomotion. In total the library holds a representative selection of 63 plates from Muybridge’s total set of 781, which were purchased for the use of GSA students in June 1917. More information about the Muybridge plates can be found on the GSA Library Treasures blog.

The display is located on the mezzanine level of the Library (Level 1), just before the stairs up to Level 2. An introduction, captions and bibliographies with suggestions for further reading can also be found in the ‘Library Display Cabinets’ folder as part of the Archives and Collections course on the VLE. Call in at the librarians’ office on Level 2 or at the Archives and Collections Centre in the basement of the Mackintosh Building for more information (you can also email Delpine Dallison, d.dallison@gsa.ac.uk, or Michelle Kaye, m.kaye@gsa.ac.uk with any questions).

Look out for future posts about our library displays here and on the Library’s GSA Library Treasures blog.

Art Critic Clare Henry’s archive comes to GSA

Clare Henry in the Mackintosh Library at The Glasgow School of Art (courtesy of The Herald)

Clare Henry in the Mackintosh Library at The Glasgow School of Art (courtesy of The Herald)

We are pleased to announce that Clare Henry, former art critic for the Herald, has donated her archive to the Glasgow School of Art.

The Glasgow Herald’s art critic for 20 years is now based in New York where she writes for the FT and a range of US and UK magazines. Clare Henry has been a key voice in visual art criticism for more than 35 years and her archive consists of over 10,000 pieces of critical writing, annotated catalogues and exhibition publicity material.

“We are delighted to have been given this rich collection,” says Susannah Waters, GSA’s Archivist. “Clare Henry’s time with The Glasgow Herald coincided with a growing recognition of the role of visual arts in the city during the 1980s and 1990s. We already have a wide range of Glasgow School of Art documents relating to this period. Clare’s writings provide a complementary perspective, a critical appreciation of work being created and shown. It will be an excellent resource for researchers looking at the visual arts in Glasgow and beyond in the latter part of the 20th and early part of the 21st century.”

“Although other places and institutions in the UK & the USA were interested, (today the internet makes distance no object), Glasgow seemed fitting,” says Clare Henry. “Although much of my writing was and is international my mother, my son and I are all art school trained and I felt that GSA would be a very good place for my archive. I hope my gift, will be helpful to both to GSA Archives and to Glasgow.”

“ Since Glasgow City of Culture 1990, the arts have put Glasgow on the international map,” adds Henry. “I hope The Clare Henry Archive will help it stay there.”

GSA’s Archives and Collections staff are currently cataloguing and repacking the documents and a catalogue for the collection will be available online from the summer of 2014. A range of the documents from the Clare Henry Archive will also be digitised and accessible online.

The Herald today has an article about Clare Henry’s archive. Clare also has a very interesting blog.

Broadsheet features article on the Glasgow Miracle project

broadsheet issue 28The current issue of Broadsheet, the Scottish Council on Archives journal, features an article on the Glasgow Miracle project. To read the article, click here: Broadsheet, Issue 28 (the article is on pages 15-16).

For more from the Scottish Council on Archives, visit their website. And to find out about the Glasgow Miracle project visit the project website and the project blog.