And Now, The BBC Genome Project

Issue from 1935: Image courtesy of the BBC Genome Project Website

Issue from 1935: Image courtesy of the BBC Genome Website

Recently the BBC have launched an exciting online project that catalogues the listings information printed in the BBC Radio Times from 1923 to 2009. Created by the BBC Archive Development in conjunction with BBC Research and Development, each page of the Radio Times since 1923 have been scanned and processed through optical character recognition systematically  to extract information – such as the title, time of showing, synopsis, contributors and so on – automatically.

Issue from 1943: Image courtesy of the BBC Genome Project Website

Issue from 1943: Image courtesy of the BBC Genome Website

Beginning in November 1922 the British Broadcasting Company published its first Radio Times on the 28th September 1923 after  the Newspaper Publisher’s Associated refused to print the BBC programme details without payment for the advertising. Since then, the Radio Times has continually published the BBC listings missing only 8 issues in its lifetime. Documenting the changes in programming, and the shifting dynamic between TV and radio this resource provides a useful starting point to investigate the role of media and the history of a publication so widely used and known in Britain.

Issue from 1968: Image courtesy of the BBC Genome Project Website

Issue from 1968: Image courtesy of the BBC Genome Website

As optical character recognition can only accomplish so much the project is giving users the opportunity to edit, correct and add to existing entries with information that may not have been included in the listing generally (for example, if a programme was cancelled or relpaced) in order to create a far more comprehensive and contextualised record.

Issue from 1994: Image courtesy of the BBC Genome Project Website

Issue from 1994: Image courtesy of the BBC Genome Website

Interestingly the addition of information by external users has become a popular method of gathering data that may simply not be held within the record, and of highlighting resources in different ways to make them more accessible to researchers. This can be seen in the recent project by the National Archives, Operation War Diarythat was launched this January to mark the centenary of the First World War (Operation War Diary – you archive needs you!), a project that encourages users to tag the data they discover within the entries, such as names, dates and places in order to make it easier for subsequent users to find.

Issue from 2007: Image courtesy of the BBC Genome Website

Issue from 2007: Image courtesy of the BBC Genome Website

Find the BBC Genome project here and see if you recognise any of these issues!

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The Mackintosh Library

The Mackintosh Library

The Mackintosh Library

Since the recent fire in the Mackintosh Building and the sad destruction of the Library there has been much discussion on how this space is going to be recreated. There has recently been a debate at Glasgow Queen’s Cross Church around whether this space should be ‘reinvented or restored’ and the symposium in Venice this Saturday will kick off the discussion on a international scale. However, locally what should or should not been done with the Mackintosh Library space is also being contemplated, with our own Interior Design course students undertaking the task of preparing a proposal for what they would do with the Library space if they had the option.

As part of the background to this project the Mackintosh Curator and Archive Assistant from the GSA Archives and Collections Centre gave a talk to the students explaining the role of the archives in the recovery process of the Mackintosh Building, and some of the issues that will face the Mackintosh Library restoration. These issues include questions around adaptations that were made to the Library during its lifetime to make it more functional, including the addition of a staircase and the use of Mackintosh Tearoom chairs for the last 50 years, rather than those originally designed for the Library. If the Library is to be restored should it be taken back to the way it was when it originally opened? Or to how it was just before the fire? Into this mix there has to be some consider of the role of people’s memory in the space’s reconstruction. Many past and current students have personal recollections of the Library and what it meant to them, should these memories be disregarded if the space is going to be re-invented? Or should they be the top priority, even above the concerns of current students, some of who will never have seen the library in its original form? The talk regarding these issues, and some of the questions raised by students can be listened to here.

First Proposals by Interior Design Students

First Proposals by Interior Design Students

First Proposals by Interior Design Students

First Proposals by Interior Design Students

First Proposals by Interior Design Students

First Proposals by Interior Design Students

First Proposals by Interior Design Students

First Proposals by Interior Design Students

The manner in which the library has adapted to the needs of students and staff in order to remain functional makes the idea of an ‘authentic’ recreation malleable. This idea of what is ‘authentic’ or not, and why it matters, was discussed in a talk by the school’s Mr Nicholas Oddy. An interesting lecture that can be heard here.

After presenting an initial proposal, the interior design students showed their final designs alongside their notes last Friday with some very interesting results.

Interior Design Students Final Proposal

Interior Design Students Final Proposal

Interior Design Students Final Proposal

Interior Design Students Final Proposal

Interior Design Students Final Proposal

Interior Design Students Final Proposal

Interior Design Students Final Proposal

Interior Design Students Final Proposal

Interior Design Students Final Proposal

Interior Design Students Final Proposal

While it is unlikely that we will know exactly what is happening with the Mackintosh Library for some time, it will hopefully continue to inspire conversations between students and staff around what could be done with this opportunity.

Something Old, Something New

As you may have noticed from our recent posts, we have been looking at how archives can inform future decisions and inspire new creations. To join the recent opening of the Anchor Line Restaurant that took inspiration from the University of Glasgow’s Anchor Line Ltd company archive, the BBC project Artist and Archive: Artists Moving Image at the BBC has recently concluded and the artist’s pieces are now online!

Left to right: Stephen Sutcliffe, Kathryn Elkin, Torsten Lauschmann, Luke Fowler, Kate Davis,and Alia Syed  Image courtesy of the BBC

Left to right: Stephen Sutcliffe, Kathryn Elkin, Torsten Lauschmann, Luke Fowler, Kate Davis,and Alia Syed
Image courtesy of the BBC

As part of this project (see our past post for the project’s original details) the six artists chosen have worked over the course of 6 months to create new moving-image artworks that take footage and inspiration from the BBC’s large film archive. All of these films can now be watched on the BBC’s website here.

The Anchor Line Ltd

The recent opening of the Anchor Line Restaurant at 12-16 Vincent Place is a wonderful example of current organisations utilising the unique materials of an archive to inform the creation of something new. Taking inspiration from the archive of the Anchor Line Ltd held by the University of Glasgow, the Di Maggio group has opened a restaurant that reflects the history of this company and the building.

University of Glasgow Library

In August, Archive Services were contacted by the Di Maggio’s Group who were restoring the Anchor Building at 12-14 St Vincent Street in Glasgow. The Anchor Building was designed by James Miller and had been built in 1905-07 as offices for the Anchor Line Ltd, a shipping company.

Brochure for the Anchor Building Brochure for the Anchor Building, c.1908 (Ref: UGD255/1/38/1/5)

The Anchor Line Ltd had its beginnings in 1838 when two brothers, Nicol and Robert Handyside, established themselves in Glasgow, Scotland, as shipbrokers and merchants. In 1856 it ran its first transatlantic crossing and by the twentieth century it ran regular transatlantic crossings, Mediterranean cruises and passenger sailings to India and Pakistan. The company had distinctive Scottish roots and was famous for its sleek ships and for the comfort it offered its travellers at a very affordable cost.

At Archive Services we hold the business records for the Anchor Line Ltd which include series of records such as advertising…

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