Calling all Russian speakers!

The catalogue for the Mackintosh exhibition, The Kremlin Museum

The catalogue for the Mackintosh exhibition, The Kremlin Museum

Glasgow School of Art’s curator Peter Trowles, or Питер Троулес, as he is known in Russian, has recently returned from a trip to Moscow where he gave a lecture on the architecture of Mackintosh’s masterpiece The Glasgow School of Art, as part of an international Mackintosh exhibition at The Kremlin Museum. Crucially, this was first time Mackintosh’s work has been seen in Moscow since 1903. The exhibition included works loaned from around the world, including many from Glasgow Museums. Sadly as a result of the fire that occurred in the Mackintosh Building earlier this year we were no longer able to loan works to this exhibition as planned, however Peter was still able to visit the exhibition, which has also seen the publication of a beautiful catalogue (see above) – unfortunately only available in Russian – and to give his lecture as part of a series of talks by British Mackintosh experts.

Glasgow School of Art's Curator Peter Trowles prepares for his Russian screen debut

Glasgow School of Art’s Curator Peter Trowles prepares for his Russian screen debut

During his time in Moscow, in a surreal twist to proceedings Peter appeared on the Russian equivalent of Newsnight to speak about the School’s Mackintosh collection and the relationship between Mackintosh and the city of Glasgow. You can watch a video of Peter’s debut on Russian television here – though sadly it’s been dubbed so will only make sense to those of you who can speak Russian! We’re sure however that what Peter had to say was very interesting…

You can find out more about the exhibition, which ran from 5th Sep 2014-9th Nov 2014, here.

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Partage Plus – Digitising and enabling Art Nouveau for Europeana

partage-plus-logoPartage Plus, starting in March 2012 and lasting for 2 years, will digitise Art Nouveau objects, artworks, posters, and buildings to create c75,000 items, including 2,000 3D models, of content for access through Europeana, a single access point to millions of books, paintings, films, museum objects and archival records that have been digitised throughout Europe

The Art Nouveau style was a great success all over Europe at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries. It is well represented, in almost every art form, in museum collections, archives, libraries, photographic archives, and on buildings throughout Europe. After a short period of disinterest, with the arrival of modernist styles, it seems that Art Nouveau is now even more popular than ever.

The amount of content to be available on Partage Plus represents a significant increase in the quantity of Art Nouveau content available on the Web. Within the scope of Partage Plus grand masterpieces of the Art Nouveau period as well as outstanding examples from the collections of the collaborating institutions will be made accessible to users. The Partage Plus website will act as the hub for meeting users’ needs and provide users with the opportunity to gather information about the Art Nouveau style; experience Art Nouveau works online through Europeana; and visit institutions with Art Nouveau collections.

Argyle High Back Chair, designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh for 120 Mains Street, Glasgow and also for the Luncheon Room, Argyle Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow, 1897

Argyle High Back Chair, designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh for 120 Mains Street, Glasgow and also for the Luncheon Room, Argyle Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow, 1897

Glasgow School of Art’s Mackintosh collection is soon to form part of the Partage Plus online catalogue. Photographers will be visiting us in October to take 3D images of the Mackintosh furniture collection, and other items from the collection, such as architectural drawings and artwork, may be available sooner than that.

The Partage Plus blog is a brilliant resource for Art Nouveau researchers and admirers, and just in the last few days, Charles Rennie Mackintosh has been the subject of two articles: one about the Glasgow School of Art, and another about House for an Art Lover.

For more information, visit the Partage Plus website.

Front cover of folio of House for an Art Lover designs, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, 1901

Front cover of folio of House for an Art Lover designs, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, 1901