Saving a Century photography exhibition

saving a century

The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland (Strathclyde Group) and the Victorian Society are holding a photographic exhibition entitled Saving a Century, curated by noted architectural historian Gavin Stamp. The exhibition will be on show at the Mitchell Library, Granville Street, Glasgow, G3 7DN from 1 – 30 October, Monday to Saturday. Free admission.

The exhibition includes:

VICTORIAN BUILDINGS LOST BEFORE 1958 – A photographic survey of some of the best Victorian buildings destroyed in the first half of the twentieth century, among them Crystal Palace (burnt down 30th November 1936), Trentham Hall, Staffordshire (abandoned by the 4th Duke of Sutherland in 1906 and demolished five years later) and Queen’s Park Church, Glasgow (Scotland’s worst architectural loss of the Second World War).

THE FOUNDATION OF THE VICTORIAN SOCIETY – Photographs and material from the opening meetings of the Society. Early members included architect Hugh Casson, architectural historian Christopher Hussey, Sir Nikolaus Pevsner and Sir John Betjeman.

THE EUSTON MURDER AND OTHER CASES – Photographs and text documenting the bitter battle for the Euston Arch, as well some of the Victorian Society’s other early defeats. There were early victories too, among them the Oxford University Museum, proposed for demolition in 1961 to make way for new science buildings. The Victorian Society also succeeded in getting the Broad Street Building of Balliol College listed, after it was threatened with a re-build in 1963.

VICTORY IN WHITEHALL – Photographs charting the heroic, ten-year campaign against plans to demolish much of the historic square mile, including nearly every building south of Downing Street and Richmond Terrace. Sir George Gilbert Scott’s Foreign Office, Richard Norman Shaw’s New Scotland Yard and Middlesex Guildhall in Parliament Square were among the buildings proposed for demolition.

PLACES OF WORSHIP – A photographic survey of some of the historic churches, chapels and synagogues with which the Victorian Society has been involved. As churches are exempt from the secular planning system, it can be particularly difficult to guard them against insensitive change. With falling attendance figures and a growing number of redundant places of worship, the future of our best churches is one of the biggest challenges facing heritage campaigners today.

RAILWAY BUILDINGS – Photographs of some of the key buildings the Victorian Society fought for, as the closure of many branch and other railway lines resulted in the redundancy of numerous stations, bridges and viaducts. That many pioneering and magnificent railway structures, such as St Pancras Station, survive today, often still in use, is very much owing to the efforts of the Society.

IRON, GLASS & STONE – Photographs of some of the most innovative nineteenth century buildings, among them Clevedon Pier, Islington’s Royal Agricultural Hall and Bradford’s Kirkgate Market, for which the Victorian Society has fought.

THE FUNCTIONAL TRADITION – Photographs of some of the most impressive industrial buildings for which the Society has fought. With the decline of the traditional industries of the North of England after the Second World War, many mills and warehouses became redundant while many Northern towns and cities became ashamed of their Victorian industrial legacy and anxious to replace it with something new. The Victorian Society, along with bodies such as SAVE Britain’s Heritage, argued that nineteenth century industrial buildings were evocative and substantial structures which were not only of historical importance but capable of gainful re-use.

THE PURPLE OF COMMERCE – Photographs of some of the most significant Victorian commercial buildings to have come under threat in the last fifty years. Built partly as self-advertisements and partly to inspire confidence, these ambitious and substantial banks, offices and warehouses too often fall victim to redevelopment schemes.

COUNTRY HOUSES – Photographs of some of the grandest country houses to have been the subject of Victorian Society campaigns, among them Shadwell Park, Tyntesfield and Highcliffe Castle. Rendered redundant by social and cultural changes, some of the most famous large houses were demolished between the wars while many more disappeared in the 1950s.

DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE – A collection of photographs of some of the Victorian villas and terraced houses for which the Victorian Society has fought. Often extravagant and fanciful buildings, these buildings are regularly demolished to allow higher density developments in their grounds or make way for flats.

PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS – A photographic survey of some of the best municipal buildings that have been saved or lost. Physical embodiments of the Victorians’ strong sense of civic pride and duty, many of these splendid town halls, libraries, swimming pools, museums, art galleries and post offices still add much to the rich character of British towns and cities today.

BEACONS OF THE FUTURE – A survey of some of the Society’s most recent campaigns, focusing on the battle for Victorian schools and swimming pools. Among the battles highlighted are the protest and funeral for Bonner School, the Public Inquiry for Easington Colliery School and the local campaign for the Moseley Road Baths in Birmingham.

THE VICTORIANS VICTORIOUS – Photographs of some of the most notable Victorian buildings used and valued today.

In conjunction with the exhibition, James Macaulay will present Saving a Century?, a talk at the Mitchell Library on Tuesday 1 October at 6.00. All welcome. Admission £4.00.

Click here for further information: SAC Glasgow poster _2013_JMacaulay_poster_rev G

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Robert Stewart Exhibition, Dunoon

Bob Stewart dunoon flyerRobert Stewart

Cowal Open Studios Guest Artist 2013

Dunoon Burgh Hall, 13 – 30 September, Preview 12 September 6-7.30pm

Cowal Open Studios and Dunoon Burgh Hall Trust present this exhibition of works by Robert Stewart, one of the design pioneers of the 20th Century.  Robert Stewart lived in Cowal from 1961 where he and Sheila raised their familyand where his widow Sheila still lives.  Their sons Alan and Billy run Stewarts Garage in Dunoon.

A number of items from Glasgow School of Art’s Archives and Collections will be on display, including some of his posters, ceramic panels and his breathtaking tapestry Genesis.

The exhibition, a partnership project between Cowal Open Studios and Dunoon Burgh Hall Trust with funding from Creative Scotland and Argyll and Bute Third Sector Fund, will be opened by Jimmy Cosgrove, former Depute Director of Glasgow School of Art and former director with House for an Art Lover.

Detail from NMC 744, ceramic panel by Robert Stewart, 1966

Detail from NMC 744, ceramic panel by Robert Stewart, 1966

The exhibition has been curated by Artist and Designer Anne E Ferguson and celebrates the work of Robert Stewart and his contemporaries. Work created by pupils from local schools across Cowal inspired by the work and philosophy of Robert Stewart will also be displayed. There will also be a Family drop-in workshops with Hannah Clinch on Friday 27th and Saturday 28th 12-3pm (bring light-coloured clothes, t-shirts/pillow slips – to print on!)

There will be a talk by Liz Arthur, author of ‘Robert Stewart, Design 1946-95’ on Saturday 21 September at 1pm. The Robert Stewart Exhibition will be shown as part of the Cowal Open Studios event from Friday 27thto Monday 30th September.www.cowalopenstudios.co.uk

The exhibition is on at Dunoon Burgh Hall from 13th-30th September, open Thursday-Sunday from 12-3pm, with a preview on 12th September from 6-7.30pm. For more information visit the Cowal Open Studios website or Dunoon Burgh Hall website.

Colouring the Nation Exhibition

Sample of printed cotton cloth showing a trade mark for 'First Quality Turkey Red', 1867. Image courtesy National Museums Scotland with kind permission of Coats plc

Sample of printed cotton cloth showing a trade mark for ‘First Quality Turkey Red’, 1867. Image courtesy National Museums Scotland with kind permission of Coats plc

A vibrant online exhibition from National Museums Scotland explains the history of ‘Turkey red in Scotland’, an ancient dyeing process that formed a thriving industry in the Vale of Leven, Dumbartonshire during the 19th century. The bright, fast red produced in the sophisticated process became the preserve of the wealthy who desired to have their cotton textiles dyed a sumptuous hue of crimson! Unlike colours such as black and yellow, the method of producing red remained an expensive process due to the complexities involved in its creation. Synthetic dyes eventually won out, but not before a beautifully ornate history had been spun as the ‘Colouring the Nation’ exhibition demonstrates.

Textile sample of Turkey red dyed and printed cotton, c 1840-50. Image courtesy of National Museums Scotland with kind permission of Coats plc

Textile sample of Turkey red dyed and printed cotton, c 1840-50. Image courtesy of National Museums Scotland with kind permission of Coats plc

The exhibition is based on a collection of 200 pattern books (the Turkey red Collection) which National Museums acquired when the Scottish industry ceased trade in the 1960s. Much like the Stoddard Design Library held by GSA Library, these pattern books were consulted as in-house design tools with a few kept as ‘show books’ for merchants and esteemed customers. The useful feature of the collection from a research point of view is that the books also form a record of the printing techniques used, something which the online exhibition has successfully adapted to interactive format. Over 500 of the designs from these pattern books are included in the exhibition, all of which are compelling not only for their variety and opulence, but for the stories they tell about the Scottish textile industry’s international client-base.

Textile sample with hand block printed design of five peacocks within a large paisley motif and one large peacock to the right with floral borders, c1860. Image courtesy of National Museums Scotland with kind permission of Coats plc

Textile sample with hand block printed design of five peacocks within a large paisley motif and one large peacock to the right with floral borders, c1860. Image courtesy of National Museums Scotland with kind permission of Coats plc

This is a visual feast of colour for the eyes which vividly recalls the history of a glorious age in the history of Scottish textiles. Search the collection by theme or conduct research into the history of the industry and its textiles by reading the collection of interpretive essays.

Reblogged from GSA Library Art and Design Resources blog.

Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh embroidered panels return from Japan

Our beautiful pair of embroidered panels by Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh, wife of Charles Rennie Mackintosh, have returned from their exhibition tour of Japan. The exhibition, entitled Klint’s Golden Rider and Vienna: Celebraring the 150th Anniversary of Klimt’s Birth, has been travelling around various galleries and museums in Japan since late 2012.

Since the Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art opened 20 years ago, Gustav Klimt’s 1903 painting Life is a Struggle (Golden Rider) has been a beloved museum treasure. Structured around this painting, this exhibition introduces the artist’s stylistic development. The exhibition also examines various influences on the production of the Golden Rider, including the influence of the arts of Japan on those of the West (japonisme), and the activities of the Vienna Secession (founded in 1897 and led by Klimt) and the Wiener Werkstätte (founded in 1903).

Embroidered panels, by Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh, c1902-1904

Embroidered panels, by Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh, c1902-1904

Our panels are linen embroidered with silk and metal threads in satin stitch and couching with silk braid, ribbon, silk appliqué, glass beads, square linen buttons painted gold. The faces are painted in watercolour on white kid stretched over card, and date from c1902-1904. Similar panels appear in Mackintosh’s drawings of the east wall of the principal bedroom at The Hill House although it is not certain when they were installed there as early photographs taken in 1904 do not show them. The panels appear to be duplicates of those shown at the Vienna Secession exhibition in 1900 and bought by Emil Blumenfelt; at least one of these (listed as a ‘bed curtain’) was lent by Blumenfelt to the Turin exhibition in 1902 – although it lacks the lower section of black silk seen on The Hill House panels.

Scots at Work: Celebrating Scotland’s Extraordinary Working Archives

A new exhibition called Scots at Work: Celebrating Scotland’s Extraordinary Working Archives is currently running at The National Records of Scotland. Celebrating Scotland’s extraordinary working archives, the exhibition including rarely-seen documents and objects from Scotland’s archives and museums, as well as the National Records of Scotland.

From Antarctic adventure to tartan, from banking to engineering, and from coal to the world’s best-selling whisky, this exhibition celebrates the diverse heritage of Scotland’s businesses, and their products and services. Scotland’s working archives provide fascinating evidence of the nation’s companies, consumers and employees at home and abroad over hundreds of years.

Six key areas represent the lives of Scots at work. They highlight Scotland’s precious archival legacy, and the special role that archives play in preserving it for the benefit of all.

  • Distilling and brewing
  • Finance
  • Fishing and agriculture
  • Heavy industry and manufacturing
  • Mining
  • Textiles

For artists and designers the textiles section may be of particular interest.

working-archive-logo-transparent-largeThe exhibition is part of the Working Archive awareness campaign, which aims to encourage archives, their users and the public at large to celebrate the heritage of Scotland’s businesses; the records of the products and services they delivered; and the legacy of working Scots of all kinds – whether in business, farming, healthcare, education, the church or government.

The campaign also seeks to illuminate how archives themselves work. It is an opportunity to raise awareness of the special role that archivists play in communities, and on behalf of the organisations and users they serve. In short, the campaign is a celebration of Scotland’s extraordinary ‘working archives’.

A fantastic gallery of images is available to view online and is an excellent resource and possible source of inspiration.

The exhibition is at The Adam Dome room in General Register House at the National Records of Scotland. It’s on now and runs until Friday 21st June. This free exhibition is open Monday – Friday 9:00 to 4:30 (closed 6 May).You can find out more about the exhibition here

Embroiderers’ Guild Exhibition at Glasgow Caledonian University

Image courtesy of The Embroiderers' Guild collection

Image courtesy of The Embroiderers’ Guild collection

Glasgow Caledonian University will host a touring exhibition of the Embroiderers’ Guild collection from 9th May-20th June 2013.

The Embroiderers’ Guild collection includes c.11,000 catalogued items, comprising pieces spanning more than six centuries and many countries. Catalogued items also include designs, threads and needlework tools.

The beginnings of the collection saw embroideries, photographs, articles on embroidery and original designs accumulated for the purpose of distribution, in boxes, to members. They were called ‘Model Boxes’. They were the forerunners of present day folios used by members and Guild branches for study, inspiration and learning. From the outset, the collection had a similar ethos to that of the Needlework Development Scheme, of which GSA Archives and Collections holds over 100 related textiles.

There is now a touring exhibition of over a hundred selected pieces from coptic times to the present day. The exhibition will also include the World’s Longest Embroidery and 3000 postcard-sized images showing the life and times of the 200 plus countries recognised by the United Nations.

For more information visit the Embroiderers’ Guild website.

Mr Dedman’s Victory Suit: Intimate stories of make do and mend exhibition

002An exhibition at Manchester Metropolitan University Special Collections entitled Mr Dedman’s Victory Suit: Intimate stories of make do and mend will showcase work by Dr Amanda Ravetz, a visual anthropologist and Senior Research Fellow, Manchester University, and Antonia Riviere, a textile artist and Artist-Facilitator at Barrington Farm Art Centre, Norwich. Work on display has been produced as part of the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia Scholars and Artists in Residence Research Fellowship Programme.

001Their 2 month research fellowship examined the role of improvisation in the generation of new knowledge and experience in artistic practice and everyday life. Using a range of archival materials they focused on austerity measures imposed during WW2, and contemporary revivals of make do and mend, and investigated how materials that have already had a first life come to influence a maker’s practice and capacity to innovate.

Work in progress by Antonia Riviere

Work in progress by Antonia Riviere

The exhibition includes contemporary video, textiles and archival material that explores the personal and intimate histories of repurposing and recycling.

The exhibition is free and runs from 15th April-30th August at MMU Special Collections Gallery in the Sir Kenneth Green Library, Manchester. Visit Amanda’s blog (which is a great record of the research project at the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia) and MMU’s Special Collections for more details.

Gillespie, Kidd and Coia Display in GSA Library

gkc displayJust to the left as you enter the library is a new display dedicated to celebrated architecture firm Gillespie, Kidd and Coia. The display features library materials alongside items from the recently catalogued and conserved Gillespie, Kidd & Coia archive. Amongst the pieces which took our fancy are spectacles, rulers and drafting tools; a study of the 1970 Glasgow Summer School at which Jack Coia taught; and a humorous collection of misaddressed mail which the partners chose to keep for posterity and amusement.

An introduction to the history of the firm and captions relating to the materials on display provide more information. These can also be found, along with bibliographies of related sources, in the ‘Library Display Cabinets’ folder as part of the Archives and Collections course on the VLE.

Look out for more posts about our cabinet displays which we hope to fill with lots more interesting items over the coming months. Each display will aim to highlight the connections between library holdings and those in the Archives & Collections, and will cover a broad range of taught subject areas, and GSA alumni. Ask at the librarians’ office on Level 1 of the library or at the Archives & Collections Centre if you have any questions, and see the library’s Architectural Resources blog for further inspiration.

Dorothy Smith material on display in GSA Library

Following International Women’s Day on Friday, GSA Archives and Collections and Library staff have created a small exhibition dedicated to Dorothy Smith, a student at GSA during World War II who studied Design and specialised in Embroidery and Weaving.

Embroidery sample showing a variety of stitches, by Dorothy Smith, c1940-1945

Embroidery sample showing a variety of stitches, by Dorothy Smith, c1940-1945

The Archives and Collections Centre holds a collection of material by Dorothy Smith, including her GSA student notebooks, her Jordanhill teacher training notebooks, textile designs and embroidery samples as well as two finished embroidery pieces, of which just a small selection is on display here. Library books thought to have been consulted by Dorothy Smith in her days as a student and still available for consultation today complement the selection from the ACC.

Studio 58: Women Artists in Glasgow Since World War II (Glasgow: Glasgow School of Art, 2012)

Studio 58: Women Artists in Glasgow Since World War II (Glasgow: Glasgow School of Art, 2012)

The display cabinet is located on Level 1 of the Library. An introduction and captions are provided alongside the display and can also be found in the ‘Library Display Cabinets’ folder as part of the Archives and Collections course on the VLE. Call in at the librarians’ office (just to the left of the display) or at the Archives and Collections Centre for more information.

Look out for future posts about our library displays here and on the Library’s Art and Design Resources blog.

Poster Art 150 – London Underground’s Greatest Designs

Brightest London, London Underground Poster, 1924

Brightest London, London Underground Poster, 1924

An exhibition entitled Poster Art 150 – London Underground’s Greatest Designs at London Transport Museum is currently showing off 150 advertising posters to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the London Underground. Each decade since the first commission in 1908 is represented and those on display have been specially selected from the Museum’s archive of over 3,300 Underground posters by an expert panel. Iconic posters, including the surrealist photographer Man Ray’s ‘Keeps London Going’ pair, as well a those by Edward McKnight Kauffer and Paul Nash, will feature alongside lesser-known gems.

We have our very own collection of transport posters, by Glasgow School of Art student John Hegarty.

NMC 570, Poster depicting Castle Campbell, Dollar. For the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hegarty, c1927

NMC 570, Poster depicting Castle Campbell, Dollar. For the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hegarty, c1927

NMC 572, Poster depicting the Wallace Monument, for the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hegarty, c1927

NMC 572, Poster depicting the Wallace Monument, for the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hegarty, c1927

NMC 571, Poster depicting Linlithgow Palace, for the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hergarty, 1927

NMC 571, Poster depicting Linlithgow Palace, for the Scottish General Omnibus Company Ltd, by John Hergarty, 1927

And, though not represented in our own collection, some other GSA graduates also went on to design for transport companies, including Tom Gentleman and Tom Gilfillan.

Easter in the country, by Tom Gentleman, 1932

Easter in the country, by Tom Gentleman, 1932. Gentleman was a student at GSA from 1905 (aged just 13) until 1914.

Scotland: Its Highlands and Islands (off Staffa) by Tom Gilfillan, printed by John Horne for LMS

Scotland: Its Highlands and Islands (off Staffa) by Tom Gilfillan, printed by John Horne for LMS

Gilfillan was a student at the Art School on and off from 1915-1931 and went on to be a designer for Scottish Aviation. The Maclaurin Gallery is planning a forthcoming exhibition of Tom’s work – Imagined Skies: The Lost Murals of Tom Gilfillan runs from 18th August – 29th September later this year.

The London Underground exhibition runs until 1st October 2013. For more information about the exhibition please visit the event website.