New display in GSA Library: Talwin Morris, Bookbinder

Mackintosh Library at Glasgow School of Art

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You may have noticed a couple of new displays in GSA Library over the last few weeks. While one of these displays, the one on Level 1, is devoted to Anatomy, we have dedicated the other on Level 2 to Talwin Morris, Bookbinder.

Talwin Morris (1865-1911) is an important figure in the history and development of Glasgow Style design at the turn of the 20th century. He knew many people who attended the Glasgow School of Art, including Charles Rennie Mackintosh who he recommended as an architect to publisher Walter Blackie. The result of that commission is the celebrated Hill House in Helensburgh.

The Library holds a number of Glasgow Style bookbindings by Morris in its special collections, designed by him during his tenure as Art Director at Blackie & Son publishers. Between 1892 and 1909 Morris was a prolific designer of bindings for the company and its subsidiary, Gresham Publishing. He…

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Reflections on a week in the Archives and Collections

My name is Nicole Cooper, and I’ve just completed a week’s work experience at the Archives and Collections Centre.

I wasn’t 100% sure on what to expect when doing work experience here, but I was just happy enough to get into the building. I’ve always liked art so being able to come here was a privilege.

I had researched the Archives and Collections before I arrived, just to get a general idea of the things they do. After grasping a general impression, I was really looking forward to starting my placement.

As I arrived at the school, I was very nervous as I want to be a student here in the future, so first impressions were important for me. But as I arrived I was very glad to see how helpful and friendly the staff at reception and in the archive were.

I got to go on a tour of the Mackintosh building, and I thought it was great to hear all the stories about Mackintosh and the students who previously went there.

I also got shown around the stores where they keep a variety of different files, paintings, furniture, prints etc. This was one of my favourite things because I got to see artwork by previous students.

During my week here I got given a variety of different tasks to do, such as digitisation, answering enquiries, and listing a new acquisition of material by a former student. I set myself some targets to try and reach every day while doing these tasks.

Stained glass detail from door of Studio 45 in the Mackintosh Buildin

Stained glass detail from door of Studio 45 in the Mackintosh Building

One of my favourite things about doing work experience here was the fact that the whole building was practically a piece of art. The stained-glass in the doors was my favourite part about the building.

However, out of all the artwork I got shown, one of my favourite things was this picture of GSA students modelling fashion designs at Kelvingrove Park in the 60s.

GSAA P/1/2413 Photograph of students modelling garments for a fashion shoot in Kelvingrove Park, 1960s

GSAA P/1/2413 Photograph of students modelling fashion designs in Kelvingrove Park, 1960s

While being on work experience here, I also worked in the school’s library. The school currently have an exhibition on called Interwoven Connections about the Stoddard Templeton design library and studio. The exhibition includes some materials from the archive and library special collections. Here is a link to some pictures of the exhibition.  All of the carpets on display belong to the archive.

Image from one of the folios in GSA Library's Stoddard-Templeton Design Library, currently on display in an exhibition in the Mackintosh Museum, Interwoven Connections

Image from one of the folios in GSA Library’s Stoddard-Templeton Design Library, currently on display in an exhibition in the Mackintosh Museum, Interwoven Connections

There is always something going on in the school which is one of the things I love about it. I hope to return here in the near future, to either become a student or come to the archive to use their great resources.

Guest blog post by Nicole Cooper, school work experience placement

Cartographies of Life and Death: John Snow and Disease Mapping Exhibition

cartographies of life and deathCartographies of Life and Death marks the bicentenary of John Snow (1813–1858). The exhibition celebrates his famous inquiry into the cholera outbreaks of 1850s London, and the lasting significance of his work in the fields of disease mapping and public health. Historical documents from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) Library & Archives, the Wellcome Library, the Museum of London and the London Metropolitan Archives, some on display for the first time, are shown alongside specially commissioned contemporary artworks. Conceived as a disease mapping ‘detective’ trail, the exhibition invites you to chart your own journey of discovery across different sites and ways of mapping.

The exhibition is on at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, from 13th March – 17th April. See the event website for more information.

Archives and Collections Centre Projects: New website feature!

GSA The Magazine, digitization project, 2010-2011

GSA The Magazine, digitization project, 2010-2011

We’ve revamped our website! You can now find out lots of information about the sorts of projects the Archives and Collections Centre has been involved in over the past few years.

From conserving the Mackintosh Building, digitizing our collections and being involved in various exhibitions and events to working on research and documentation projects such as the Glasgow Miracle and the Gillespie, Kidd and Coia architecture project, please do have a look at the website to find out more about what we’ve been up to.

If you are interested in working with the Archives and Collections Centre as part of a collaborative and/or creative project, please get in touch, we’d love to hear from you.

Gillespie, Kidd and Coia, research and cataloguing project, 2006-2009

Gillespie, Kidd and Coia, research and cataloguing project, 2006-2009