Tonight! In Conversation: Lucy Reynolds & Sarah Neely on ‘A Feminist Chorus’

MAPLUCY REYNOLDS: A FEMINIST CHORUS, APRIL—NOVEMBER 2014
A FEMINIST CHORUS FILM INSTALLATION, 7 NOV—7 DEC, PLATFORM, GLASGOW
TALK: SARAH NEELY + LUCY REYNOLDS, TUE 25 NOV, 6—7.30PM, GLASGOW WOMEN’S LIBRARY

Find out more about Lucy’s use of Glasgow School of Art’s archives on our previous post

Calling all Russian speakers!

The catalogue for the Mackintosh exhibition, The Kremlin Museum

The catalogue for the Mackintosh exhibition, The Kremlin Museum

Glasgow School of Art’s curator Peter Trowles, or Питер Троулес, as he is known in Russian, has recently returned from a trip to Moscow where he gave a lecture on the architecture of Mackintosh’s masterpiece The Glasgow School of Art, as part of an international Mackintosh exhibition at The Kremlin Museum. Crucially, this was first time Mackintosh’s work has been seen in Moscow since 1903. The exhibition included works loaned from around the world, including many from Glasgow Museums. Sadly as a result of the fire that occurred in the Mackintosh Building earlier this year we were no longer able to loan works to this exhibition as planned, however Peter was still able to visit the exhibition, which has also seen the publication of a beautiful catalogue (see above) – unfortunately only available in Russian – and to give his lecture as part of a series of talks by British Mackintosh experts.

Glasgow School of Art's Curator Peter Trowles prepares for his Russian screen debut

Glasgow School of Art’s Curator Peter Trowles prepares for his Russian screen debut

During his time in Moscow, in a surreal twist to proceedings Peter appeared on the Russian equivalent of Newsnight to speak about the School’s Mackintosh collection and the relationship between Mackintosh and the city of Glasgow. You can watch a video of Peter’s debut on Russian television here – though sadly it’s been dubbed so will only make sense to those of you who can speak Russian! We’re sure however that what Peter had to say was very interesting…

You can find out more about the exhibition, which ran from 5th Sep 2014-9th Nov 2014, here.

New display in GSA Library: Talwin Morris, Bookbinder

Treasures of GSA Library

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You may have noticed a couple of new displays in GSA Library over the last few weeks. While one of these displays, the one on Level 1, is devoted to Anatomy, we have dedicated the other on Level 2 to Talwin Morris, Bookbinder.

Talwin Morris (1865-1911) is an important figure in the history and development of Glasgow Style design at the turn of the 20th century. He knew many people who attended the Glasgow School of Art, including Charles Rennie Mackintosh who he recommended as an architect to publisher Walter Blackie. The result of that commission is the celebrated Hill House in Helensburgh.

The Library holds a number of Glasgow Style bookbindings by Morris in its special collections, designed by him during his tenure as Art Director at Blackie & Son publishers. Between 1892 and 1909 Morris was a prolific designer of bindings for the company and its subsidiary, Gresham Publishing. He…

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Explore Your Archive: Discover Georgina Goldie Killin

49c9e97cdcGlasgow School of Art wants YOU to explore our archives! 

We’re taking part in this year’s National Archives Explore Your Archive archives awareness campaign, which launches on 16th November. Did you know that Glasgow School of Art’s archives are about more than just Mackintosh? There’s so much more to explore. We invite you to delve into our collections and discover some of the other artists, designers and architects who nurtured their careers at the Art School.

Alison Brown, curator of European Decorative Art at Glasgow Museums, examining items from our archives

Alison Brown, curator of European Decorative Art at Glasgow Museums, examining items from our archives

We have developed a series of story boxes, each one containing items chosen by one of our users, to help illustrate how various researchers, from a wide range of backgrounds (academics, creative practitioners, architects, students, exhibition curators) are using our holdings.

GSAA/P/1/1022 Georgina Goldie Killin (top row, 5th from the right), designer of the ceramic vase, with fellow GSA staff, c1920s

GSAA/P/1/1022 Georgina Goldie Killin (top row, 5th from the right), designer of the ceramic vase, with fellow GSA staff, c1920s

Ceramic vase held by Glasgow Museums and now on display as part of a revamp of the Charles Rennie Mackintosh Gallery at Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery. The vase was designed by Georgina Goldie Killin, who was a student and later a member of staff at Glasgow School of Art. Image credit: © CSG CIC Glasgow Museums Collection

Ceramic vase held by Glasgow Museums and now on display as part of a revamp of the Charles Rennie Mackintosh Gallery at Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery. The vase was designed by Georgina Goldie Killin, who was a student and later a member of staff at Glasgow School of Art. Image credit: © CSG CIC Glasgow Museums Collection

The contents in the first box in the series have been chosen by Alison Brown, curator of European Decorative Art at Glasgow Museums. These items helped Alison in her research on the designer Georgina Goldie Killin for a new display of Glasgow Style ceramics in the Charles Rennie Mackintosh Gallery at Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery.

One of these boxes is in Kelvingrove beside the new display and one is on the ground floor in front of the service desk at GSA Library. Drop in and open the box to take a look at just a small selection of items from Glasgow School of Art’s vast Archives and Collections. If you have a smartphone, you can even scan the QR codes to hear Alison talk about the items! 

Our archives and collections are an outstanding resource for the study of art, design, architecture and art education. They include records and artefacts which relate to the School’s activities since its foundation in 1845. The archives comprise of GSA’s institutional records, and a number of collections deposited by former staff, students and related organizations. The collections include examples of art, design and architectural work by GSA alumni and former staff, including around 300 pieces by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Who knows what you might discover…

Find out more about the Explore Your Archive campaign on the campaign website. Find out more about the new display at Kelvingrove on the Glasgow Museums website and in this article in The Herald.

GSA Library Special Collections blog relaunch

GSATREASURESGSA Library’s Special Collections blog has just relaunched in a beautiful new WordPress format. Special Collections is home to, amongst other fabulous collections, The Stoddard Design Library (the in-house reference library of one of the world’s most successful carpet manufacturers) and a collection of Glasgow Style bookbindings including those by Talwin Morris, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, and “Glasgow Girl” Jessie M King. Take a look at the new site for more information about their wonderful collections, which also includes artist’s books, engravings, prize books and trade journals.

Bookbinding by Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Bookbinding from the Glasgow Style collection

Design from the Stoddard Design Library

Design from the Stoddard Design Library

The blog is brimming with inspirational images. Examples of how artists and other creative practitioners have been using the library and Special Collections in their work are available on The Hatchery. Visit the blog and be inspired!

Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh embroidered panels return from Japan

Our beautiful pair of embroidered panels by Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh, wife of Charles Rennie Mackintosh, have returned from their exhibition tour of Japan. The exhibition, entitled Klint’s Golden Rider and Vienna: Celebraring the 150th Anniversary of Klimt’s Birth, has been travelling around various galleries and museums in Japan since late 2012.

Since the Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art opened 20 years ago, Gustav Klimt’s 1903 painting Life is a Struggle (Golden Rider) has been a beloved museum treasure. Structured around this painting, this exhibition introduces the artist’s stylistic development. The exhibition also examines various influences on the production of the Golden Rider, including the influence of the arts of Japan on those of the West (japonisme), and the activities of the Vienna Secession (founded in 1897 and led by Klimt) and the Wiener Werkstätte (founded in 1903).

Embroidered panels, by Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh, c1902-1904

Embroidered panels, by Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh, c1902-1904

Our panels are linen embroidered with silk and metal threads in satin stitch and couching with silk braid, ribbon, silk appliqué, glass beads, square linen buttons painted gold. The faces are painted in watercolour on white kid stretched over card, and date from c1902-1904. Similar panels appear in Mackintosh’s drawings of the east wall of the principal bedroom at The Hill House although it is not certain when they were installed there as early photographs taken in 1904 do not show them. The panels appear to be duplicates of those shown at the Vienna Secession exhibition in 1900 and bought by Emil Blumenfelt; at least one of these (listed as a ‘bed curtain’) was lent by Blumenfelt to the Turin exhibition in 1902 – although it lacks the lower section of black silk seen on The Hill House panels.