Robert Stewart Exhibition, Dunoon

Bob Stewart dunoon flyerRobert Stewart

Cowal Open Studios Guest Artist 2013

Dunoon Burgh Hall, 13 – 30 September, Preview 12 September 6-7.30pm

Cowal Open Studios and Dunoon Burgh Hall Trust present this exhibition of works by Robert Stewart, one of the design pioneers of the 20th Century.  Robert Stewart lived in Cowal from 1961 where he and Sheila raised their familyand where his widow Sheila still lives.  Their sons Alan and Billy run Stewarts Garage in Dunoon.

A number of items from Glasgow School of Art’s Archives and Collections will be on display, including some of his posters, ceramic panels and his breathtaking tapestry Genesis.

The exhibition, a partnership project between Cowal Open Studios and Dunoon Burgh Hall Trust with funding from Creative Scotland and Argyll and Bute Third Sector Fund, will be opened by Jimmy Cosgrove, former Depute Director of Glasgow School of Art and former director with House for an Art Lover.

Detail from NMC 744, ceramic panel by Robert Stewart, 1966

Detail from NMC 744, ceramic panel by Robert Stewart, 1966

The exhibition has been curated by Artist and Designer Anne E Ferguson and celebrates the work of Robert Stewart and his contemporaries. Work created by pupils from local schools across Cowal inspired by the work and philosophy of Robert Stewart will also be displayed. There will also be a Family drop-in workshops with Hannah Clinch on Friday 27th and Saturday 28th 12-3pm (bring light-coloured clothes, t-shirts/pillow slips – to print on!)

There will be a talk by Liz Arthur, author of ‘Robert Stewart, Design 1946-95’ on Saturday 21 September at 1pm. The Robert Stewart Exhibition will be shown as part of the Cowal Open Studios event from Friday 27thto Monday 30th September.www.cowalopenstudios.co.uk

The exhibition is on at Dunoon Burgh Hall from 13th-30th September, open Thursday-Sunday from 12-3pm, with a preview on 12th September from 6-7.30pm. For more information visit the Cowal Open Studios website or Dunoon Burgh Hall website.

The James Guthrie Orchar print collection

The collection of James Guthrie Orchar (1825-1898), Dundee industrialist and inventor, consists of over 400 works (paintings and drawings) held by The McManus: Dundee’s Art Gallery and Museum since 1987. It is an extremely rare collection in that it remains as a collection, evidence of one man’s personal taste. The collection has recently been digitized and is now available to search and browse online. The website also includes an interesting section about the techniques involved in creating prints.

portrait by John Pettie, James Guthrie Orchar (1825-1898), Provost of Broughty Ferry (1886-1898), 1884. Oil on canvas, 107.7 x 86.4 cm. Dundee Art Galleries and Museums.

Portrait by John Pettie, James Guthrie Orchar (1825-1898), Provost of Broughty Ferry (1886-1898), 1884. Oil on canvas, 107.7 x 86.4 cm. Dundee Art Galleries and Museums.

Orchar was an important patron of the Arts and fostered a number of personal relationships with the artists whose work he collected. The value of Orchar’s art collection lies in its local and national significance. It is a rare existing example of the interests of a prominent late Victorian collector and subsequently provides in microcosm a considerable illustration of the tastes and fashions of the period and the online catalogue of images is a wonderful resource for inspiration.

The Fiddler (Becquet), by James Whistler, 1859.

The Fiddler (Becquet), by James McNeill Whistler, 1859. Dundee Art Galleries and Museums.

Whilst the majority of oils in Orchar’s Collection are by Scottish artists, Orchar favoured English and Continental artists for his prints collection, including works by Sir Hubert Herkomer, James Clarke Hook, Josef Israëls and Samuel Palmer. By far the largest selections in his collection are the eighteen by Sir Francis Seymour Haden and the thirty-six by James Abbott McNeill Whistler.

The project was a collaboration between the University of St Andrews’ School of Art History and The McManus: Dundee’s Art Gallery and Museums and was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Cultural Engagement Fund.

For more information visit the Orchar Print Collection website.

Arts and Crafts at the National Archives

'Poppyland' furniture fabric registered by Liberty, February 1904 (BT 50/536/427344). Image courtesy National Archives

‘Poppyland’ furniture fabric registered by Liberty, February 1904 (BT 50/536/427344). Image courtesy National Archives

The Arts and Crafts style, beginning with William Morris and his contemporaries in the mid 19th Century, has endured for over 150 years. In fact just a few days ago the William Morris Gallery in Walthamstow was named as the winner of the Art Fund Prize for Museum of the Year 2013, highlighting how much interest there still is in the Arts and Crafts movement and its characteristic style. 

'Almond Blossom and Swallow' wallpaper sample designed by Walter Crane, registered by Jeffrey & Co, July 1878 (BT 43/102/323809). Image courtesy National Archives

‘Almond Blossom and Swallow’ wallpaper sample designed by Walter Crane, registered by Jeffrey & Co, July 1878 (BT 43/102/323809). Image courtesy National Archives

As such the National Archives have written a fascinating blog post about the Arts and Crafts design highlights in their own collection. e hold records of designs registered for copyright with the Board of Trade and successor departments between 1839 and 1991, including samples and original designs by Morris & Co, as well as many registrations of designs by Liberty. Records from 1842 to 1883 are in BT 43(representations – drawings, paintings, photographs or samples of the design) and BT 44 (registers). These series have been catalogued by item, and are searchable online by registered design number, proprietor, date, address and (sometimes) description of object. See our online guide for more information about registered designs. These records form an absolutely outstanding resource for artists and designers. 

See the National Archives blog for more information. The annual Liberty Arts and Crafts Exhibition is also currently underway. 

'Anemone' furniture fabric design registered by Morris & Co, February 1876 (BT 43/372/298226). Image courtesy National Archives

‘Anemone’ furniture fabric design registered by Morris & Co, February 1876 (BT 43/372/298226). Image courtesy National Archives

Celia Birtwell reworks archive prints for Uniqlo collection

celia birtwell  for UniqloTextile designer Celia Birtwell famed for her collaborative work with Ossie Clark  and whose iconic printed designs epitomise the 1960s and 1970s has reworked designs from her archive for a new collection for Japanese fashion brand Uniqlo.

Birtwell for UniqloCelia’s designs have been reworked, resized, re-coloured and re-imagined. While some of her most famous designs, including Candy Flower and Mystic Daisy, feature in the collection, Celia has also reworked and updated some of her designs especially for Uniqlo. For example, she has amended some of her home furnishing fabrics for the purposes of fashion – her Beasties print, depicting mythological creatures inspired by a 17th century embroidery she found in the basement of the V&A, has been digitally resized to accommodate its change in purpose.

The collection will be launched on March 21st. Visit Uniqlo’s website for more details.

celia birtwell

 

Artists using archives: Gabriella Marcella DiTano, Risotto Studio

Gabriella Marcella DiTano is a graphic designer and publisher. She recently founded Risotto Studio, a risograph print and design specialist based in Glasgow.

She visited GSA Archives and Collections recently to look at our photography collection, specifically at the archive photographs we have featuring the Mackintosh Building.

GSAA_P_7_76GSAA_P_7_122

She was given a brief to transform the images using her risograph printing technique. The images she produced are fantastic…

Gabriella Marcella DiTano

Gabriella Marcella DiTano

Here’s what she had to say about her experience of using our archives:

I thought the archives had such an interesting selection, it proved hard to shortlist the images (hence there are three, and not just one!)
A few of the compositions were really unusual and showed me totally new sides to the building. It was great to work with such a unique collection, especially as I don’t normally work from found images.

The Risograph is a screen printing press from the Japanese company Riso. Similar to a photocopier, it permits high-speed printing in screenprint quality. It is not only much more environmentally friendly than other printers, but also more cost effective. This process is therefore ideal for graphic arts applications such as posters, zines, print editions and cards.

For more information about Gabriella and her work visit her website or the Risotto Studio website.