New user case studies

We’ve just added some more user case studies to our website so you can find out about how various types of researchers have been using the Archives and Collections Centre.

DC077/11Carpet sample from our Stoddard Templeton collection, featuring tomato plant design

DC077/11 Carpet sample from our Stoddard Templeton collection, featuring tomato plant design

In these new case studies Helena Britt discusses her research for the recent Interwoven Connections: The Stoddard Templeton Design Studio and Design Library, 1843-2005 project which resulted in the exhibition currently on display in the Mackintosh Gallery; Jade Richardson, a Glasgow School of Art Product Design student tells us about how she used our resources in her research for a WW1 memorial project; and Annie Lavety, Retail Manager at GSA Enterprises, tells us how she used our collections to research and develop new products for GSA’s shop.

NMC 204, War scene with wounded soldiers, by Charles Davidson, 1914

NMC 204, War scene with wounded soldiers, by Charles Davidson, 1914

So visit the case studies section of our website, read about what other users have been up to, and get inspired!

Remember you can always contact us if you would like to use our archives and collections for your own research, be it family history, academic, educational, commercial or for creative practice.

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Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art Archive & Library event

The staff of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art Archive & Library are holding an event at Modern Two on Tuesday 19th November, 6-8pm.

The event is aimed at academic staff and postgraduate students who have a specific research interest in modern and contemporary art and culture, and will provide an introduction to the research opportunities, materials and services available in the Reading Room. Refreshments will be served in the Great Hall before moving on to view some of the highlights of our collections. Even if you are already familiar with the Archive & Library, it’s a great opportunity to chat to staff, and some of our curators will also be on hand to discuss the Gallery’s current and forthcoming exhibition programme.

Please call 0131 624 6253 to RSVP.

Details of the research resources available at the National Galleries of Scotland and the online catalogues can be found at: http://www.nationalgalleries.org/research/libraries-archives. For more information on the National Galleries of Scotland in general visit their website.

 

Up the Women

BBC Four's Up the Women

BBC Four’s Up the Women

There seems to have been a burgeoning interest in the Women’s Suffrage Movement recently, if prime time television is anything to go by anyway. Last week we had Clare Balding’s Secrets of a Suffragette on Channel 4, investigating what really happened when activist Emily Davison threw herself in front of the King’s Horse during the Epsom Derby on the 4th of June, 1913, and last night saw the first episode of BBC Four’s Up the Women, a comical look at the struggle for women’s suffrage.

Written by and starring Jessica Hynes, the programme, despite its comic edge, seems to be fairly historically accurate, and we wonder if Jessica visited any archives during her research for the series. The biggest battle of all seems to be against other women:  “Women in trousers! Driving motor cars! Is that what you want?” exclaimed one of the less inclined characters.

The costumes in particular seemed very authentic, and reminded us of some items from our own textile collection. As luck would have it, last night’s programme coincides with an archive visit today by a researcher interested in GSA’s very own suffragette Ann Macbeth. As such we had an excuse to dig out some of our own textiles from the time.

NMC 420 - Embroidered Yoke/Collar, c.1911-1920, probably worked by one of Ann Macbeth's students

NMC 420 – Embroidered Yoke/Collar, c.1911-1920, probably worked by one of Ann Macbeth’s students

The focus at the time seems to have been on domestic items: table runners, place mats, teacosies, aprons, collars; but with an emphasis on making the everyday beautiful. The colours are also often surprisingly bright, and one or two of our items even feature the recognisable purple, white and green of suffrage.

Ann Macbeth (top left) painting alongside fellow female students, c1912

Ann Macbeth (top left) painting alongside fellow female students, c1912

See our previous post about Ann Macbeth, written to celebrate International Women’s Day on the 8th March.

You can watch Up the Women on BBC iPlayer.

Archives and Collections user case studies

CAD drawing of Gillespie, Kidd & Coia's St Bride's Church, East Kilbride, by Ambrose Gillick

CAD drawing of Gillespie, Kidd & Coia’s St Bride’s Church, East Kilbride, by Ambrose Gillick

We’ve recently added some case studies to our website about how various types of researchers have used Glasgow School of Art’s Archives and Collections Centre.

East-west elevation of the Mackintosh Building, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, 1897

East-west elevation of the Mackintosh Building, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, 1897

So far these include information about how, for example, Ambrose Gillick, an architectural researcher, has used the Gillespie, Kidd & Coia archive in his work on the project Roman Catholic Church Architecture in Britain 1955-1975, and about how designer Gabriella DiTano of Risotto Studio (who we’ve blogged about previously) used our photograph collection as the basis for a commissioned piece of work using her celebrated risograph print technique.

Gabriella Marcella DiTano

Gabriella Marcella DiTano

There’s also some information about how architectural historian Joseph Sharples has been using the institutional archives in his work on the Mackintosh Architecture: Context, Making and Meaning project, and some feedback from Phil Palmer, a researcher with a personal interest in the artist Maurice Greiffenhagen, who was a tutor at the Glasgow School of Art at the beginning of the 20th century.

GSA_NMC014 Washerwomen, by Maurice Greiffenhagen

GSA_NMC014 Washerwomen, by Maurice Greiffenhagen

Visit the Case Studies section of our website for more information, we plan to add more examples very soon.

Contact us if you would like to use our archives and collections for your own research, be it family history, academic, educational, commercial or for creative practice.

New Glasgow Miracle blog post

Volunteer archive researcher Cedric Tai shares more of his thoughts about his work on the Glasgow Miracle project… Visit the Glasgow Miracle blog to read about the ways in which the Third Eye Centre archive illustrates how the centre saw itself as a source of education and a place to consider social and contemporary issues but all the while had to balance this with accessibility.

This is an image of a publication between Acme, SPACE and the Arts Council of Great Britain, The image is courtesy of the Third Eye Centre/CCA

This is an image of a publication between Acme, SPACE and the Arts Council of Great Britain, The image is courtesy of the Third Eye Centre/CCA

The Glasgow Miracle: Materials for Alternative Histories

The Third Eye Centre. Image courtesy of the Third Eye Centre/CCA

The Third Eye Centre. Image courtesy of the Third Eye Centre/CCA

In case you don’t already know, Glasgow School of Art, in partnership with CCA (Centre for Contemporary Arts), has been awarded a grant by the AHRC for a speculative research project that will open up previously inaccessible archive material to assist research and reflection upon the causes and conditions which encouraged the renaissance of the visual arts in Glasgow since the late 1970s.

The project is well underway now, and archive and research volunteers have been busy blogging about their work on the project. Visit the Glasgow Miracle blog for more information about the project and to read about what volunteers have been up to.