Our new website and online catalogue launches today!

Today we’re thrilled to announce the launch of a new website and online catalogue for our holdings.

This is an exciting step for the Archives and Collections. By making our collections more accessible online, we hope to promote our magnificent holdings and facilitate the use of our archives and museum objects by both GSA staff and students as well as external users for the purposes of learning, teaching and research. This project has been kindly supported by Museums Galleries Scotland.

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Our main aim has been to make the catalogue as user-friendly as possible. We understand that academic users generally require detailed descriptions and information on, for example, how access to originals, copies and copyright,and in that sense the catalogue is still very traditional. However we are also aware that creative practitioners, who make up a significant proportion of our users, really appreciate the ability to browse and quite often rely on serendipity to find inspiration for their work, therefore, wherever possible, we have tried to include images alongside records, opening up a treasure trove of beautiful items to the public.

To browse images of our holdings, simply click on one of the 8 categories on our homepage.

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Alternatively you can also search by keyword on our catalogue.

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Our new website also includes user case studies and new subject-based archive resource guides, as well as a brand new format for our blog, so please remember to hop on over to our new blog and subscribe for updates. This current blog will disappear shortly.

Textiles    Vis Comm

As a result of the fire which occurred in the Mackintosh Building earlier this year, physical access to our collections is limited and we are sadly currently unable to welcome researchers to our searchroom, so providing virtual access to our collections has become even more vital at this time.

We’ll keep you updated on our progress and will be posting all week about the features of the website and online catalogue, so stay tuned. Happy browsing!

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The Grant Loaf

 

Image of Doris Grant courtesy of 'Exorphin Junkie: Confessions of an amateur breadmaker'.

Image of Doris Grant courtesy of ‘Exorphin Junkie: Confessions of an amateur breadmaker’.

Doris Grant (nee Cruikshank) was a student at The Glasgow School of Art in the 1920s. She won a scholarship to study in Rome before being forced to leave the school upon her engagement. She also had a very unique claim to fame. After art school, Doris Grant went on to become a nutritionist and during World War II accidentally invented what is now known as the Grant Loaf after discovering that she had forgotten to knead the bread before baking. Campaigning against refined carbohydrates and the production of over-processed foods such as white bread, this simple loaf became an important point in Doris Grant’s nutrition theory.

Having suffered from severely painful rheumatoid trouble in her joints, Doris Grant found little relief and was nearly crippled by the condition. However this all changed when presented with an unorthodox treatment: a diet consisting of three columns of food – proteins, starches and acid fruits – with the following instruction, ‘Don’t mix foods that fight!’. These instructions had a profound effect on Grant’s life, apparently relieving the pain she had previously felt and by her own account making her feel happier, fitter and healthier. This diet was based on a theory put forth by Dr William Howard Hay, and it  inspired Grant to publish two books based on the Hay system of eating.

In honour of our multi-talented alumnus, it seemed only fitting to try and bake a Grant Loaf. Following the recipe by Lorraine Pascale on BBC Food, Jocelyn Grant our archive assistant mixed the following ingredients:

  • 225g/8oz strong white bread flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 225g/8oz strong wholemeal flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 x 7g sachet fast-action dried yeast
  • 1 tbsp clear honey
  • 300ml/11fl oz warm water
  • vegetable oil or oil spray, for oiling
  • a little milk, for brushing

She left the dough to rise (crucially without kneading first), shaped it and baked at 200c for 35 minutes. See an exciting time-lapse video of this process here.

A slice of Grant Loaf.

A slice of Grant Loaf.

After thorough testing by the archival department, we can certainly recommend this recipe.

An ‘Uneasy Balance’.

Now that the Reid Building has opened, architects, and the public alike, will finally get a chance to look inside the building and see whether or not this space works as an art school. At the recent screening of ‘Facing Up to Mackintosh’ a discussion between Stuart MacDonald and David Reid highlighted the need to examine the interior of the building and its merits alongisde that of the exterior (seek out #artscreen on twitter for some of the comments reflecting the reception of this event and documentary).

Outside The Reid and The Mackintosh Building on opening day.

Outside The Reid and The Mackintosh Building on opening day

Even before its completion The Reid Building had succeeded in sparking a lively discussion around its merits and potential detractors, a discussion that is likely to continue as it settles into its new home.

One of the 'Driven Void' columns inside The Reid Building.

One of the ‘Driven Void’ columns inside The Reid Building.

The GSA’s own Johnny Rodger and Christopher Platt have added to this debate with their published articles in ‘Uneasy Balance’, and ‘Putting Hall and Mackintosh in multi-perspective: the new building at the Glasgow School of Art’ in the Architectural Research Quarterly Journal, by Johnny Rodgers.

'Uneasy Balance' Front Cover

‘Uneasy Balance’ Front Cover

This book contains four essays in total and an interview with Steven holl discussing the design concept and some of his working practices. Included are some specially commissioned photographs as well as sketches and drawings that can only help enhance an understanding of the process behind this buildings creation. This book is available from the GSA Mackintosh Building Shop for £15, and is now available in the GSA library for perusal for anyone wishing to investigate the creative process and intial reception of this space.

Second floor of The Reid Building

Second floor of The Reid Building